Static.COOKIE_BANNER_CAPABLE = true;

EARLY INTERVENTION IS GOOD

Although this article is from America, it makes interesting reading and the principles of early intervention apply.  In line with the Rose Review (2009), we do not necessarily agree that a diagnosis is always the right way forward at an early age.  A Specialist Teacher's report, which indicates a person's strengths and weaknesses, may be adequate to start specialist teaching.   

http://tn.chalkbeat.org/2016/03/14/parents-push-for-more-screening-support-for-students-with-dyslexia/#.Vu26IPmLQ2w

USE 'BAD' INSTEAD OF 'DISASTROUS' BECAUSE YOU CAN SPELL IT

In our experience, we have seen that many people with dyslexia have the most difficulty with learning to spell and to get their ideas down on paper.  At least with reading, the words are already there on the page instead of a person being faced with a blank page.  There is so much to retrieve from long term memory - specific letters, how to form them and put them in the correct sequence for spelling, word order, grammar, punctuation, tenses - to say nothing of meaning, which is the main idea behind why we write in the first place.

http://www.theguardian.com/education/2016/mar/11/primary-school-spelling-tests-dyslexic-pupils-teachers

EYESIGHT NOT LINKED TO DYSLEXIA

Many people believe that dyslexia is primarily caused by eyesight but this research carried out at Bristol and Newcastle universities explains that those with dyslexia are no more or less likely to have eye-related problems.  The Rose Review (2009) states that the characteristic features of dyslexia are difficulties in phonological awareness, verbal memory and verbal processing speed.  

http://www.bristol.ac.uk/news/2015/may/dyslexia-sight.html